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SPAN S318: Writing Spanish for Heritage Speakers

Bases de datos y más

Bases de datos de varias disciplinas (interdisciplinary)

Noticias Internacionales

Bases de datos de disciplinas específicas 

Click on the "i" for more information about each database, what subjects it covers, and what types of content it has.

Recursos de la red

Vea también la caja abajo que se llama "Web resources, open access databases, and search engines" (abajo).

Finding the Full-Text of an Article

Finding the full-text of an article from a citation

When you have found a promising source in a print bibliography or footnotes, the foolproof method for getting access to the full-text is to search for the Journal TITLE in the Electronic Journals List (search box below). Do not search for the article title, do not waste your time searching JSTOR or other databases.


 

 

Example of a Journal Citation (text in bold=title you want to search)

Fine, M. (1988) ‘Sexuality, Schooling, and Adolescent Females: The Missing Discourse of Desire’, Journal Title:Harvard Educational Review 58(1): 29–53.

If we don't have access to the full-text of the journal, Interlibrary Loan allows you to obtain journal articles at no cost to you. Delivery of most documents is done electronically via e-mail. 

Web resources, open access databases, and search engines

When searching open web or internet resources, be sure to use Boolean-style searching when appropriate. Google and Google Scholar have advanced search operators and field searching. Many of the open-access (Open Access open lock logo or OA) databases listed here have advanced search screens and help menus to assist you.

Understanding LC Call Numbers

What exactly is a call number anyway?
A call number is the unique number given to each book in the library. Call numbers are like addresses, they tell you where a book will be located in the library.

Why should I know how to read one?
If you understand how to read a call number, it will be a lot easier for you to find books in the library.

What does a call number look like?
This library uses LC call numbers (LC stands for Library of Congress), which use a combination of letters and numbers. The same exact call number can be written 2 different ways:

A call number that you find in IUCAT (the online library catalog) will look like this:
CT105 .K55 1981

And that same call number will look like this on the spine of the book:
CT
105
.K55
1981
 
So, here's how you read a call number on the spine of a book:
CT        --Read it alphabetically (A, B, C, CT, D, E, F, G, H, HA, HQ, etc.)
105       --Read it numerically (1, 10, 100, 100.5, 105, 1005.10, etc.)
.K55     --Read alphabetically and then decimally (.A23, .A233, .A33, .B4555, .B50, etc.)
1981     --The final line is a date.
 
And here is how this book would be placed on the shelf:

CT
104
.P281
1930
CT
104
.P7
1830
CT
105
.H866
1995 
CT
105
.K55
1981 
D
105
.H43
1992

 

So now that I know how to read a call number, how do I use it to find books in the library?

  1. When you find a book that looks interesting in IUCAT, make sure you write down the entire call number.
  2. Check the location code to find out in what library the book will be (IUCAT contains books from all IU libraries).
  3. Look at the first letter(s) of the call number. Use this to figure out what part of the library to go to. Once you are on the correct floor, look for labels at the end of each set of bookshelves. These will tell you what call numbers can be found on those shelves.
  4. Find the book on the shelf and take it to the Service & Information Desk (2nd Floor) to check it out.